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OK, so what are some examples of messages "framed from a moral perspective" that can reach those bi-conceptuals?

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The main topic of the 10/8/23 episode of Last Week Tonight dealt with the lack of curriculum supervision and standards in America's home schooling system. It is permeated with white nationalism, fascism, and a panoply of bigotries. There is no shortage of children whose upbringing excludes exposure to ideas other than their parents' beliefs. It's no wonder that there are teens and young adults whose minds are closed to anything not full-on MAGA. Old progressives like me like to think that the far right lemmings will die off and be replaced by young voters committed to equality, saving the planet, and peace. Sadly, not so fast.

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It seems to me that the imagination is less constrained by neural circuitry and therefore offers a more productive ground for sowing new ideas and ways of seeing oneself and the world. Where appeal to reason fails, art and the power of narrative may find a way.

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NYT:"Win It Back’s most promising pandemic-themed ad: “This ad was our best creative on the pandemic and vaccines that we tested in focus group settings, but it still produced a backlash in our online randomized controlled experiment — improving President Trump’s ballot support by four points and net favorability by 11 points.”..."

OUCH! BACKFIRED!!

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So what can Joe Biden say to convince non trumpers who dont like him and dont seem to understand or want to consider the costs of not voting for third party voting....something like "Ive been a public servant all my life and thats somebody who is in service to others. I am a person of empathy and caring. You may not agree with my policies but choosing someone else is the highest risk bet you may ever take. Help me save democracy in

America. Vote Biden!" Or better words to that effect??

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So Hoffer in "the true believer" indicates that mass movements are interchangeable (III.14) and that it is possible to stop one by substituting another (III.16). This is repeated again in XIII.61 last paragraph: "The fanatic can not be weaned from his cause by an appeal to his reason or moral sense. ... He cannot be convinced but only converted.". In the next section he notes that "it is easier for a fanatic communist to be convert to fascism... than to become a sober liberal."

Then in "the psychology of totalitarianism" by Desmet [who is mostly relying on Arendt as far as I can tell] in chapter 8 mentions "A more strategic option to break through the mass formation could also be considered: replacing one object of anxiety with another." In the paragraph before he also notes the small percentage of the population not under the sway of the movement can form a "countergroup"to provide an alternative voice. How to do that is left as an exercise to the reader unfortunately.

So there are other people over the years saying mostly similar things. I can't tell if morality and framing is a superceding/umbrella framework. Perhaps someone can clue me in.

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What is the extent of a frame?

If I take my car to a red hat wearing mechanic because of an idiot light and he hooks up a scan tool and it reports that the "right front tire pressure sensor is broken", does he mutter to himself that the right is never wrong and head off on a wild goose chase on the left side of the car?

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I disagree. They may be 'beyond the reach of logic, persuasion or rationality', but that does not mean they are beyond reach. To reach them, you must set aside enlightenment thinking and most of a college education. Your best training can be found in your local synagogue, mosque, or church. There you will find people who know how to persuade and appeal beyond reason. And most of them teach compassion, gratitude, caring and love, 24/7/365. Lakoff's emphasis on metaphor is basic training for thoughtful readers of scripture.

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