15 Comments

Fishstick Carlson was able to show Orban in a loving light - perhaps journalist can engage in some reporting on what life is LIKE in an autocracy? How does the press fare? The courts? Political adversaries? Interview the person-on-the-street there (while protecting their identity and then explaining why that’s necessary)... “This is what TFG promises to do for America...”

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Consider articulating easily understood and supported goals rather than the abstract term “democracy.”

I want …

majority rule

election system that increases voters’ power and options

political media that speaks truth and accuracy over neutrality between parties

more economic and political equality

a safe world for my kids

It’s not clear whether voters care about an abstract democracy but recent elections suggest we strongly oppose book bans, limiting abortion and denying election results.

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The media can do its own work and stop using the same video and story line as every other news organization so that every news outlet isn’t reporting the same story every day

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Don't avoid emotions. Journalists tend to avoid expressions that are too emotional. That hands the arena to Trump.

Clarify his words with George's taxonomy of tweets, show what he's actually doing. https://twitter.com/GeorgeLakoff/status/948424436058791937

If possible, clarify the difference between Trumps and Bidens values

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We need to frame admission of making mistakes in a positive way. A person's self-esteem takes a hit if they publicly change their opinion on a candidate or issue. Flip-flops are just cheap shoes lacking support. Changing one's beliefs on the basis of accumulating evidence is a sign of smaturity and wisdom. It should be praised, not mocked.

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https://itheresies.blogspot.com/2004_11_01_archive.html

2024!!! The American press haven't learnt anything for over TWENTY YEARS!

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Media needs to stop saying "President Trump" and always say, "Former President

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The press quotes Trump's long-time "spokesman" Steven Cheung incessantly, and without the fact-checking that has finally been applied to some portion of what Trump says. Cheung's statements are typically vile, demeaning, and essentially the words of Trump but attributed to someone else, to give them an unwarranted free ride. Cheung's "riling up the base" has the same divisive effect and disengagement from reality as the words of Trump himself, and, if his statements are to be quoted at all, they should be subjected to the same level of fact-checking. A lie is a lie, whether it comes from Trump directly or his henchman-in-chief.

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Journalists should pay particular attention to Trump's (and Elon Musk's and others') messaging on "free speech", "censorship", etc. Don't use their language on these issues. Because it's a completely twisted logic/framing, and it's one of their main focuses.

For example, Musk says it's "censorship" (or "blackmail") when companies won't advertise on his toxic platform. Nope, it's basic commercial freedom. Thus, Musk is *opposing* freedom when it's against his self-interest. Same with Trump.

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What are our journalism schools teaching? What is the public doing to separate truth from fiction? What is the media doing to assist in both?

If you want to read another great column explaining why this election is different from all other elections? Best column to date - NYT - by Robert Kalgan, emphasized by Steve Beschloss Substack.

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If journalists want to be considered professionals, they should first pass standardized minimum proficiency testing, as with every other professional with potential to harm, including cosmetologists, doctors, lawyers, accountants, engineers, pilots, etc., etc. That’s a generally well- accepted principle. That’s right, cosmetologists are professionals, journalists are not in my book. Any Tom, Dick, or Mary can claim to be a journalist, with zero training or credentials, and can they ever harm the public. Since there is supposedly freedom of the press, it would have to be a voluntary certification of course (with fees!, welcome to our world!), but those who aren’t certified should have to disclose that, and for those who do pass, it would be a verifiable testament to their knowledge base and dedication to a profession, if it were one. It’s not. Yet.

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One problem that has lingered for the past year this how the media frames Donald Trump. When they report anything about him, they frame the conversation by normalizing him. Nine times out of ten they will say “Donald Trump, leading Republican candidate for president.” Although the media might be reporting his outbursts at the NY fraud trial, or his attacks on the judges and prosecutors in his four indictments, they want to normalize him, rather than reporting who he really is, and the danger he presents as America’s head of its authoritarian/autocratic party. Does the media not realize that another Trump presidency will put them in jeopardy. The media frames its interactions with Donald Trump as if his actions are normal.

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